Résidence André Honnorat


History

The plans for the building were based on drafts made by Lucien Bechmann that were adapted by Larson. Originally, the dispensary for the Cité internationale was housed here.

The Cité internationale’s dispensary

The André Honnorat Residence, named after one of the Cité internationale’s founding fathers, was made possible by a donation from Louis Dreyfus in 1930 and was constructed in 1936, at the same time as International House. The plans for the building were based on drafts made by Lucien Bechmann that were adapted by Larson. Originally, the dispensary for the Cité internationale was housed here.

Did you know?
The André Honnorat Residence and the site’s administrative building flank the entrance to the Cité internationale, making for a grand welcome.

Converted into a residence

When a hospital was built just on the other side of Boulevard Jourdan (today it is known as the Institut Mutualiste Montsouris) the Cité internationale no longer saw the need to have its own dispensary, and the building was converted into housing for students and researchers, adding 90 more lodgings to the site. This transformation was overseen by the architect Girard, who had worked alongside Lucien Bechmann in the past.

The International Centre for Short Stays

The André Honnorat Residence together with the Robert Garric Residence form the International Centre for Short Stays (CICS). Its goal is to encourage exchanges and meetings between residents from all over the world, whatever their origins, language or culture. The Foundation hosts students, teachers and researchers who are staying between three days and ten months. Residents are selected upon an application detailing their university career, their ambitions and their revenue.