Maison du Mexique


History

Jorge L. MEDELLIN drew up the plans for Mexico House, which today includes 90 rooms, and his brother Roberto E. MEDELLIN, engineer, worked alongside him to construct the building.

Funding from the Mexican government

In the 1920s, the French government invited Mexico to take part in the construction of the Cité internationale, and in 1925 a site was set aside for a building to house Mexican university students. However, it wasn’t until the 8 October 1953 that the work, financed by the Mexican government, was finished and the building finally opened.

Did you know?
Mexico House is funded by Mexico’s ministry of public education. The Mexican ambassador to France sits at the head of the house’s board of trustees

Modern architecture

Jorge L. MEDELLIN drew up the plans for Mexico House, which today includes 90 rooms, and his brother Roberto E. MEDELLIN, engineer, worked alongside him to construct the building. He envisioned a modern-looking building made up of two parallel, relatively long wings connected by a building with a more free form shape. Originally, male and female students were housed separately in the two wings located on either side of a patio with greenery. As for the inside of the house, Charlotte PERRIAND and Jean PROUVÉ designed the furnishings.

Did you know?
In 2006, the House acquired a replica of the Sun Stone, the Aztec calendar measuring 3.6 metres (nearly 12 feet) in diameter that was discovered in Mexico City’s main square in 1790.

A library lies at the heart of the house

Mexico House is home to one of the six specialised libraries within the Cité internationale, the Sor Juana INÈS DE LA CRUZ Library, comprising nearly 27,000 volumes about Mexico.