Maison des Étudiants de l’Asie du Sud-est


History

Pierre Martin and Maurice Vieu were the two architects chosen to draft the plans for the building, originally designed with 100 rooms.

The former Indochina House

In 1930, Indochina House opened its doors at the Cité internationale, the result of a determined committee made up mostly of French businessmen working in South-East Asia. Its conception was clearly rooted in the colonial French political attitude of the time, and the building was intended to represent a blend of the modernity of France and the traditions of South-East Asia.

Asian style

Pierre Martin and Maurice Vieu were the two architects chosen to draft the plans for the building, originally designed with 100 rooms. The design is inspired by the architectural traditions of South-East Asia, and this can be seen in the building’s overhanging eaves and the upturned corners of the roof. The Oriental theme continues inside with the staircase, whose design was inspired by a pattern taken from the Hué Imperial Palace. The house also has a central garden.

Did you know?
One room has recently been refurbished to show how the rooms originally looked, and a fresco by the Vietnamese painter Le Pho was installed in the lobby of the house.

Recent renovations

In January 1972, the house was re-baptised South-East Asia House, and it has undergone other changes since then. In 1998, the roofs and façades were restored, and in 2007 the interior was renovated. More student rooms were added and existing rooms were renovated. Every room has a private bathroom, and the new furnishings are made to-measure.

Did you know?
In 2008, the Cité internationale entered into a partnership with ParisTech, a consortium of 12 grandes écoles specialising in science, technology and management. The partnership opened residency in South-East Asia House to students from ParisTech.